Lashed To The Mast

I’ve been reading and learning so much from Eugene Peterson these days regarding pastoral ministry.  His work, The Contemplative Pastor, is re-shaping (in a Biblical way) how I understand my calling as an under-shepherd of the Chief Shepherd, Jesus Christ.

I’d like to provide an extended quote from this book, that lines up really well with the idea that “my people pay me not to have a job, so that I might be a shepherd.”

The last 2+ years of ministry have been essential for me to understand that Peterson is right, and that it reflects my heart’s desire.  I believe this is a painful, beautiful, redemptive, Biblical picture of the relationship between a shepherd and his flock.  I believe that every pastor longs for his people to believe this about and want this from him.  I believe as pastors we all want to be lashed to the mast in the way Peterson describes.

Please continue on when you have time to really read these wise and powerful words for the church ::

…century after century, Christians continue to take certain person in their communities, set them apart, and say, “You are our shepherd.  Lead us to Christlikeness.”

Yes, their actions will often speak different expectations, but in the deeper regions of the soul, the unspoken desire is for more than someone doing a religious job.  If the unspoken were uttered, it would sound like this:

“We want you to be responsible for saying and acting among us what we believe about God and kingdom and gospel.  We believe that the Holy Spirit is among us and within us.  We believe that God’s Spirit continues to hover over the chaos of the world’s evil and our sin, shaping a new creation and new creatures.  We believe that God is not a spectator, in turn amused and alarmed at the wreckage of world history, but a participant.

“We believe that the invisible is more important than the visible at any one single moment and in any single event that we choose to examine.  We believe that everything, especially everything that looks like wreckage, is material God is using to make a praising life.

“We believe all this, but we don’t see it.  We see, like Ezekiel, dismembered skeletons whitened under a pitiless Babylonian sun.  We see a lot of bones that once were laughing and dancing children, adults who once aired their doubts and sang their praises in church – and sinned.  We don’t see the dancers or the lovers or the singers – or at best catch only fleeting glimpses of them.  What we see are the bones.  Dry bones.  We see sin and judgment on the sin.  That is what it looks like.  It looked that way to Ezekiel; it looks that way to anyone with eyes to see and brain to think; and it looks that way to us.

“But we believe something else.  We believe in the coming together of these bones into connected, sinewed, muscled human beings who speak and sing and laugh and work and believe and bless their God.  We believe it happened the way Ezekiel preached it, and we believe it still happens.  We believe it happened in Israel and that it happens in church.  We believe we are a part of the happening as we sing our praises, listen believingly to God’s Word, receive the new life of Christ in the sacraments.  We believe the most significant thing that happens or can happen is that we are no longer dismembered but are remembered into the resurrection body of Christ.

“We need help in keeping our beliefs sharp and accurate and intact.  We don’t trust ourselves; our emotions seduce us into infidelities.  We know we are launched on a difficult and dangerous act of faith, and there are strong influences intent on diluting or destroying it.  We want you to give us help.  Be our pastor, a minister of Word and sacrament in the middle of this world’s life. Minister with Word and sacrament in all the different parts and stages of our lives – in our work and play, with our children and our parents, at birth and death, in our celebrations and sorrows, on those days when morning breaks over us in a wash of sunshine, and those other days that are all drizzle.  This isn’t the only task in the life of faith, but it is your task.  We will find someone else to do the other important and essential tasks.  This is yours: Word and sacrament.

“One more thing: We are going to ordain you to this ministry, and we want your vow that you will stick with to it.  This is not a temporary job assignment but a way of life that we need lived out in our community.  We know you are launched on the same difficult belief venture in the same dangerous world as we are.  We know your emotions are as fickle as ours, and your mind is as tricky as ours.  That is why we are going to ordain you and why we are going to exact a vow from you.  We know there will be days and months, maybe even years, when we won’t feel like believing anything and won’t want to hear it from you.  And we know there will be days and weeks and maybe even years when you won’t feel like saying it.  It doesn’t matter.  Do it. You are ordained to this ministry, vowed to it.

“There may be times when we come to you as a committee or delegation and demand that you tell us something else than what we are telling you now.  Promise right now that you won’t give in to what we demand of you.  You are not the minister of our changing desires, or our time-conditioned understanding of our needs, or our secularized hopes for something better.  With these vows of ordination we are lashing you fast to the mast of Word and sacrament so you will be unable to respond to the siren voices.

“There are many other things to be done in this wrecked world, and we are going to be doing at least some of them, but if we don’t know the foundational realities with which we are dealing – God, kingdom, Gospel – we are going to end up living futile, fantasy lives.  Your task is to keep telling the basic story, representing the presence of the Spirit, insisting on the priority of God, speaking the biblical words of command and promise and invitation.

That, or something very much like that, is what I understand the church to say – even when the people cannot articulate it – to the individuals it ordains to be its pastors.

May God help his people and shepherds, for his glory and our joy.

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